Testosterone and Prostate Cancer: The Myth

For more than 6 decades, the medical establishment erroneously conjectured that testosterone replacement therapy increases one’s risk of developing prostate cancer. This fear has made it standard practice for physicians to deprive hypogonadal male patients of testosterone replacement that could otherwise provide them with a world of cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, cognitive, metabolic, and emotional benefits.

Remarkably, though, it appears that, in most cases, the opposite is true—lower levels of endogenous testosterone present a greater risk of prostate cancer than higher levels (Morgentaler 2009). A review of data from the National Institutes of Health revealed that, in men of advancing age, “high testosterone levels are not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, nor are low testosterone levels protective against prostate cancer” (Morgentaler 2006).

A collaborative review of 18 prospective studies compared serum concentrations of androgen and estrogen in 3,886 men with prostate cancer with those in 6,438 healthy controls. The results showed no significant associations between the risk of prostate cancer and sex hormone levels (Roddam et al 2008).

In more than 500 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (followed over a mean of 8.7 years), high androgen levels were actually associated with a decreased risk of aggressive prostate disease, compared with no change in the risk of non-aggressive disease. Overall, levels of any steroid hormones (except estradiol) were not correlated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Severi et al 2006).

 

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